Cardiovascular Disease

 

 

 

 

Effect of Molecular Hydrogen on Cardiovascular protection.

  • Protects against ischemia / reperfusion injuries

  • Protects against hypertension

  • Improves survival and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest

  • Minimizes heart dysfunction

  • Helps prevent veinous thrombosis

  • Improves hemodynamics (blood flow)

  • Improves endothelial cell function (inner wall of blood vessels)

  • Enhances nitric oxide functioning

Related Studies

Hydrogen-supplemented drinking water protects cardiac allografts from inflammation-associated deterioration.

Noda K1, Tanaka Y, Shigemura N, Kawamura T, Wang Y, Masutani K, Sun X, Toyoda Y, Bermudez CA, Nakao A.

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that molecular hydrogen has therapeutic value for disease states that involve inflammation. We hypothesized that drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) daily would protect cardiac and aortic allograft recipients from inflammation-associated deterioration. Heterotopic heart transplantation with short-course tacrolimus immunosuppression and orthotopic aortic transplantation were performed in allogeneic rat strains. HW was generated either by bubbling hydrogen gas through tap water (Bu-HW) or via chemical reaction using a magnesium stick [Mg + 2H(2) O → Mg (OH)(2)  + H(2) ] immersed in tap water (Mg-HW). Recipients were given either regular water (RW), Mg-HW, Bu-HW, or Mg-HW that had been subsequently degassed (DW). Graft survival was assessed by daily palpation for a heartbeat. Drinking Mg-HW or Bu-HW was remarkably effective in prolonging heart graft survival and reducing intimal hyperplasia in transplanted aortas as compared with grafts treated with RW or DW. Furthermore, T cell proliferation was significantly inhibited in the presence of hydrogen in vitro, accompanied by less production of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ. Hydrogen treatment was also associated with increased graft ATP levels and increased activity of the enzymes in mitochondrial respiratory chain. Drinking HW prolongs survival of cardiac allografts and reduces intimal hyperplasia of aortic allografts.

 

Hydrogen-supplemented drinking water protects cardiac allografts from inflammation-associated deterioration.

 

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that molecular hydrogen has therapeutic value for disease states that involve inflammation. We hypothesized that drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) daily would protect cardiac and aortic allograft recipients from inflammation-associated deterioration. Heterotopic heart transplantation with short-course tacrolimus immunosuppression and orthotopic aortic transplantation were performed in allogeneic rat strains. HW was generated either by bubbling hydrogen gas through tap water (Bu-HW) or via chemical reaction using a magnesium stick [Mg + 2H(2) O → Mg (OH)(2)  + H(2) ] immersed in tap water (Mg-HW). Recipients were given either regular water (RW), Mg-HW, Bu-HW, or Mg-HW that had been subsequently degassed (DW). Graft survival was assessed by daily palpation for a heartbeat. Drinking Mg-HW or Bu-HW was remarkably effective in prolonging heart graft survival and reducing intimal hyperplasia in transplanted aortas as compared with grafts treated with RW or DW. Furthermore, T cell proliferation was significantly inhibited in the presence of hydrogen in vitro, accompanied by less production of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ. Hydrogen treatment was also associated with increased graft ATP levels and increased activity of the enzymes in mitochondrial respiratory chain. Drinking HW prolongs survival of cardiac allografts and reduces intimal hyperplasia of aortic allografts.

Other related studies:

1.Drabek, T. and P.M. Kochanek, Improving outcomes from resuscitation: from hypertension and hemodilution to therapeutic hypothermia to H2. Circulation, 2014. 130(24): p. 2133-5.

2.Fujii, Y., et al., Insufflation of hydrogen gas restrains the inflammatory response of cardiopulmonary bypass in a rat model. Artif Organs, 2013. 37(2): p. 136-41.

3.Hayashi, T., et al., Inhalation of hydrogen gas attenuates left ventricular remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in mice. American Journal of Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 2011. 301(3): p. H1062-9.

4.Hayashida, K., et al., H(2) gas improves functional outcome after cardiac arrest to an extent comparable to therapeutic hypothermia in a rat model. J Am Heart Assoc, 2012. 1(5): p. e003459.

5.Hayashida, K., et al., Hydrogen Inhalation During Normoxic Resuscitation Improves Neurological Outcome in a Rat Model of Cardiac Arrest, Independent of Targeted Temperature Management. Circulation, 2014.